Mongolia cultural vacation & Naadam Festival

“Enjoy a truly unique 'day at the races' after experiencing the culture, landscapes and nomadic lifestyles of Mongolia's Middle Gobi and central heartlands.”

Highlights

Ulaanbaatar urban walking tour | Rural homestay in Khangai Mountains | Gobi Oasis Tree Planting Project | Gobi rural homestay with Arildipurev family | Walking ger to ger Orkhon Waterfall | Explore Mongolia's oldest monastery | Rural Naadam Festival | Optional activities include: horse treks

Travel Team

If you'd like to chat about this vacation or need help finding one we're very happy to help. The Travel Team.

Toll free 1-111-111-6111 Calling from outside the US?

Check dates

2019: 26 Jun
Our top tip:
Stocking up on souvenirs in UB may seem like a good idea. However, you're bound to have a few spontaneous encounters with artisan traders en-route which will enable you to really keep things local.
Trip type:
Small group or tailor made, 2-6 people.
Activity level:
Leisurely-moderate.
Accomm:
Homestays and family run ger camps.
Included:
Entrance to the Nadaam Festival, all accommodation and walking tour of Ulaanbaatar.
Meals:
All meals provided by the team.
Solos:
Single travelers welcome. No single supplement.
Vouchers
Accepted

Responsible tourism

Responsible tourism: Mongolia cultural vacation & Naadam Festival

Environment

Always a tricky one this. We can promise you the world but how do we prove it? Responsible, sustainable or ethical travel - in recent years, it has developed many labels and is now a widely-used selling tool in the tourism industry. But, what does it mean? Although there is no real clear definition, it has to be more than ensuring that we collect all of our rubbish, asking before taking a photograph or being aware of the cultural norms. That’s what we should be automatically doing anyway.

Below are some of the elements of my responsible travel philosophy for our Journey Among Nomads itinerary where we can show real evidence of our practise.

City Nomads Folding Bike

Each of the tour vehicles we send out have a city nomads folding bike. We provide this service for free. Why? It allows our guests to explore further into each region but without relying further on the tour vehicle. It also allows for informal interaction between the local community and our guests as we let the locals use the bikes as well.

Although we are reliant on 4x4 vehicles for the main section of the tour (after all, this is Mongolia!), in the city centre we do use public transport rather than private mini-vans for our city tours.

Waste

The disposal of rubbish is a major issue in Mongolia - especially with plastic. As part of my Uneasy no settle ethos I pay a local Mongolian NGO (Mongolian Quilting Centre) to make fabric tote bags for our guests which we hand out for free as a welcome pack at the start of each trip. This is a souvenir for our guests but it also helps to support the project and helps us to cut down on the waste we produce. As part of your Spring Journey experience, you will also receive such a tote bag.

Also, you can book knowing that we finance our own two-day rubbish collection at Terkhiin Tsagaan Nuur National Park in Mongolia. Arranged through the local community and protected area rangers, we have been organising this annual event since 2014.

Group Size

Unlike a majority of the larger tour companies, where small group travel can mean being in a group of up to 12-18 people, when we say small group travel this is what I mean. Our group size on this trip has been kept small - a maximum of six. This means that experiences during this itinerary become more personal and authentic for you such as your stay with Tumee and Jargaa and their family at the Orkhon River. We are not an overwhelming presence - on the local communities or the local environment.

Our itineraries and departures

Our philosophy is to have a limited amount of departures for each of our itineraries and we only offer our Journey Among Nomads once a year. We also do not concentrate specifically on one area.

Mongolia is a country of incredibly diverse yet fragile ecosystems. By limiting our presence in certain areas, we help to preserve and protect and help to avoid the area changing environmentally due to repeated and extended exposure to tourism.

Yes on some of our experiences we do visit areas where tourism has become more concentrated but for this itinerary we mainly focus on areas that are not necessarily considered ‘highlights’ by other tour companies or the guidebooks such as Erdenedalai. Wherever we visit, supporting local is at the heart of what we do and at the centre of each experience we offer. By not focusing on one specific area, it also means that we help to support communities that might not otherwise benefit from the tourism industry.

Our trips also focus on 21st Century Mongolia - yes, you’ll get to experience the traditional way of life but at the same time gain an overview as what it means to be Mongolian in 21st Century Mongolia. Tumee and Jargaa have a mobile phone. It doesn’t mean their way of life is dying out and that they’ll be shortly moving into the city - just that their way of life is adapting. Tumee and Jargal who will host you in Kharkhorin have a mobile phone. It doesn’t mean their way of life is dying out and that they’ll be shortly moving into the city - just that their way of life is adapting. Just like ours is.

The people we work with are ‘real’ people. Not tourism professionals. You’ll meet people from Ulaanbaatar, you’ll meet herders, you’ll meet Mongolians that live in the provincial centres as well as the smaller town and rural communities. They are all Mongolians. Take time out to meet them.

Water

First up, we do not provide bottled drinking water as apart from in the capital city, there is just no way to recycle the bottles. Instead, we take fresh drinking water from local water supply points. We provide two 20 litre water containers and provide a Lifesaver carbon filter and an Adventurer Steripen in each vehicle.

Also, for a majority of all of our trips we do not use the typical tourist ger camps that often have very bad eco-credentials. Instead, we use a mix of accommodation and use the locally provided town shower houses. This is where a majority of Mongolia's rural population come to shower. They are small business enterprises operated for the local communities and a great way to support local, meet the locals and do as the locals do themselves. It also helps us to manage our own environmental footprint.

In 2017 we started working with Water-To-Go. Our travelers are now able to purchase a Water-To-Go reusable filtered water bottle and receive a 15% discount. From each purchase an additional 15% is donated towards the Mongolian well-project run by CAMDA (Cambridge Mongolia Development Appeal) that we support. This NGO directly supports Mongolia’s herders.

Community

Combatting Desertification - Cooperative Ar Arvijin Delgerekh

As part of this trip you will stay with rural families who are part of this Cooperative based in the Khangai Mountains.

Much of Mongolia’s tourism sector depends in the long term on the preservation of the country’s cultural and physical landscapes. But, by visiting Mongolia, you are making your own impact on the country.

The Cooperative is a local people-led project that is committed to working at a grassroots level towards long term preservation. It focuses on working with herders producing spun yak wool, providing them with an alternative to diversify and increase their income and helping them to protect the land which provides them with their way of life.

Taking A Road Trip

A majority of visitors who visit the Gobi fly down to Dalanzagad - the provincial capital of the southern Gobi. However, most of the guests know and understand the philosophy behind our 'road trips' - that flying from place to place gives you no context of location, no real experience of the country or the lives of the people in-between. That’s why our Journey Among Nomads trip focuses on traveling across country - it slows you down and gives you time to experience the ‘places in between’, the places and communities not actually mentioned in the guidebooks.

Cultural Impact

Our company is not a ‘world specialist’; we concentrate on the country we know and love – Mongolia. We research, design and operate each itinerary ourselves and do not source our itineraries from other agents.

Supporting local is at the heart of what we do. Part of this philosophy is that we used ger accommodation provided by the Mongolian families. At no point have we ever rocked up and demanded accommodation. Our relationships with the families we work with are genuine - forged over time and with plenty of tea.

Families offer ger accommodation to help supplement their income. Most are small rural businesses providing extra accommodation. Some accommodation is offered by herders, some is offered by ‘retired’ herders who no longer migrate, some by families that live in small town communities and some by families that own small ger camp businesses. By using this form of accommodation it provides you with a more genuine insight in to the real way of life in Mongolia and it benefits the local communities through which we are traveling.

However, these are real people with real lives to lead and at no point do we ask the families to change their way of life for our/your own benefit or comfort. If they don’t have a shower, neither will you! (Don’t panic!…see below!). We ask our guests to try and embrace (!) and enjoy any differences that they come across in Mongolia. Experiencing the differences is all part of any trip and makes it a more authentic and positive vacation for you and a more respectful and enjoyable experience for the locals as well.

One example of this is our use of the local town shower houses. Very few families have access to running water from a tap. We do as the locals do and use the local town shower houses such as the one in Kharkhorin. They’re a great way to meet members of the local community but it also means we do not put too much pressure on local resources. In the words of author Jack Weatherford in Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World – ‘Compared to the difficulty of daily life for the herders, living permanently in those areas, ours were only the smallest of irritations.’

We have even written our own guide to the culture and traditions of Mongolia - researched over the 13 plus years I have lived and worked in Mongolia. You receive this guide on your arrival into Mongolia as a way of preparing you for your experience.

Ulaanbaatar

You’ll start off in Mongolia’s capital city. Read a guidebook or a travel forum and frequently Ulaanbaatar is overlooked. But, it's home to roughly 45% of Mongolia's population and this alone means that it should be experienced. We don't offer a tour of museums or souvenir shops but a day spent walking through the local areas of the city. What’s it like to live there? What kind of communities exist? What are the challenges? My aim is that you experience all aspects of Mongolian culture - rather than just those highlighted by guidebooks.

A majority of Ulaanbaatar's 1.4 million (ish) population live in the ger districts that surround the central downtown - approximately 60% of the population actually. There are few safe community spaces within the ger districts - especially community spaces where children can play. But, Nogoon Nuur (Green Lake) is bucking this trend. Nogoon Nuur is now a thriving community space made possible by a committed individual, Ulzii, who since 2012 has been working to restore Nogoon Nuur and develop a public park.

I love this community area immensely and we now include a visit on our free city walking tour - making a donation per EL guest per visit. On our family trips, we arrange and fund for the visiting children to purchase and donate reading books to the Nogoon Nuur community space.

Training school for Mongolian women

As a female, it is important to me to use my skills and influence to improve the prospects for other women. We don’t source the best guides that work the tourism circuit and that already have guaranteed work with other companies. Instead, we provide training and development opportunities to Mongolian women that other companies won't take as they don't fit the stereotype or have the professional qualifications.

Our female Mongolian trip assistants are dynamic women who are searching for an opportunity to train and develop and we provide that long-term opportunity.
You’ll travel with someone who sincerely loves their home country, loves their job and genuinely care about you as our guests.For us, this is a long-term investment and we invite you to part of this philosophy. We’re proud to be able to provide a starting block to women in Mongolia.

Naadam Festival

From my perspective, non-Mongolians often get very caught up in notions of authenticity when it comes to the Mongolian Naadam Festival - often asking which events are more touristy than another. However, Naadam is a national celebration for Mongolians.  It is also a favoured public vacation, one of Mongolia’s top sporting events, a celebration of culture and tradition and pride, and a vibrant festival. It is a celebration of first-class sportsmanship, ordinary people taking pride in their country  and century’s old tradition melded together.  It is also a time when Mongolians celebrate who they are, how proud they are to be Mongolian, their heritage and the qualities that produced the warrior nation of Genghis Khan. If you read anywhere about Naadam being too touristy, ignore it. Naadam will be so much more than you will probably expect it to be.  It draws a large number of Mongolians – there are  far more Mongolian spectators than foreigners- creating a vibrant vacation atmosphere.  The most important thing to remember is to experience Naadam from a Mongolian perspective.

Keeping it Local

Yes, the tents for our camping trips are from a UK manufacturer but everything else is sourced in Mongolia and as much as possible, made in Mongolia. Where possible, we don’t just buy from a shop but we source the material ourselves from the markets in Ulaanbaatar and then have each product made to our specifications through local family businesses. Supporting local is a major part of who we are and we make a constant effort to support local businesses. We only use Mongolian owned accommodation, we buy Mongolian produce for the meals on the tour including ‘stocking-up’ in the smaller towns that we pass through so they benefit from our custom. We also use locally owned restaurants both in UB and in the countryside. We encourage you to support traditional crafts by buying direct from local artisans who you'll meet en-route as well as purchasing products from the projects we support. We try to put money and support back into the local communities, strengthening local businesses, families, and individuals that represent all spectrums of Mongolian life.

Popular similar vacations

Western Mongolia tour, the Altai mountains & eagles

Western Mongolia tour, the Altai mountains & eagles

Culture and adventure in the landscapes of western Mongolia

From US $2345 - US $2945 13 days excluding flights

Mongolia tour, mountains & nomads

Mongolia tour, mountains & nomads

Slow travel through Mongolia's northern & central landscapes

From US $2165 - US $2350 13 days excluding flights

Mongolia adventure vacation, small group

Mongolia adventure vacation, small group

Music the remote Mongolian countryside

From US $3255 - US $5195 15 days excluding flights

Mongolia tour, hunting with Eagles

Mongolia tour, hunting with Eagles

Eagle hunter homestays & hunting with eagles, west Mongolia

From US $1560 - US $2425 9 days excluding flights

https://progressive.ua

ковры в киеве

proffitness.com.ua/category/crossfit/